Love Is Not Only What You Know


Sometimes, things today are better than they used to be. But that’s not always the case. WIGHT know exactly when to take queues from the modern world and when to go back to the roots. Combining a powerful groove with complexity and extraordinary musicianship, they celebrate their musical journey throughout times past and present. Presenting doom-based psychedelic rock at the beginning of their career, WIGHT these days are Miles (Davis) ahead of that. Their carefully crafted fusion rock sound incorporates influences from artists as diverse as the Beatles, Parliament/Funkadelic and Mahavishnu Orchestra. Throw in some African rhythms and sounds along the lines of Osibisa, and the sun will rise even in the coldest and darkest places.

This makes their concerts an intense experience – an almost sacral atmosphere can often be felt at WIGHT’s live shows, not only because of the incense used by the band to enhance their performances since the very beginning. WIGHT know how to fan the flames of excitement in the listener and make their audience dance, sing along and indulge in their epic compositions at the same time.


  • A1 | Helicoper Mama
  • A2 | The Muse & The Mule
  • A3 | Kelele
  • B1 | Three Quarters
  • B2 | I Wanna Know What You Feel
  • B3 | Biophilia Intermezzo
  • B4 | The Love For Life Leads To Reincarnation

Vinyl Factz.

  • Plated & pressed on high performance vinyl in Germany
  • 111x yellow red black marbled (Exclusive mailorder edition, handnumbered)
  • 200x transparent blue
  • 200x black
  • Deluxe gatefold cover, spot-lacquered
  • Special vinyl mastering

The press wrote.

Keys, claves, temple blocks, drums, bass, guitar — all of it creates a fitting swirl to end the expansive feel of the record as a whole, but it’s important to note that the more pervasive vibe comes from the live feel of the song itself, and that’s also a consistent thread tying Love is Not Only What You Know together even as it continues to introduce new ways of working in its final moments. It is unquestionably Wight‘s most vibrant release, and to listen to it and Wight Weedy Wight next to each other, one would hardly even recognize it’s the same band. Because it’s not.

I said their last time out that I wouldn’t want to predict where they head next, and while they seem to have found a niche for themselves otherwise largely unoccupied in European heavy rock, the same applies here. Wight have shown time and again that their commitment is to following their creative will rather than a predetermined “sound,” and on their third album, that will has produced an accomplished collection of intricate but vital songs that redefine the band’s scope entirely.

What that might mean for the future, who knows? Who cares? It’s a party. Groove out and rock on.

The Obelisk